Wednesday, April 23, 2014

America at Work: Photographs by Lewis Hine

March 6, 2013Print This Post         

Power house mechanic working on steam pump, 1920

Rose Biodo, Philadelphia, 10 years old. Working 3 summers, minds baby and carries berries, two pecks at a time. Whites Bog, Brown Mills, N.J. This is the fourth week of school and the people expect to remain here two weeks more. 1910

Ivey Mill. Little one, 3 years old, who visits and plays in the mill. Daughter of the overseer. Hickory, N.C., 1908


Some of the doffers and the Supt. Ten small boys and girls about this size out of a force of 40 employees. Catawba Cotton Mill. Newton, N.C., 1908

3 A.M. Sunday, February 23rd, 1908. Newsboys selling on Brooklyn Bridge. Harry Ahrenpreiss, 30 Willet Street. (Said was 13 years old). Abe Gramus. 37 Division Street. Witness Fred McMurray. Location: New York, N.Y., 1908

Breaker Boys, 1910

A little spinner in the Mollohan Mills, Newberry, S.C. She was tending her ‘sides’ like a veteran, but after I took the photo, the overseer came up and said in an apologetic tone that was pathetic, ‘She just happened in.’ Then a moment later he repeated the information. The mills appear to be full of youngsters that ‘just happened in,’ or ‘are helping sister.’ 1908

Glassmaking, 1908

Old-timer, keeping up with the boys. Many structural workers are above middle-age. Empire State [Building]., 1930

In the Mill, 1930

Child coal miners, 1908


About the Artist:

Lewis Hine (September 26, 1874 – November 3, 1940) was an American sociologist and photographer.

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