Berfrois

Jennifer Seaman Cook on Grunge

Jennifer Seaman Cook on Grunge

They're saying grunge is almost dead. You can almost hear it coming. As a counterethos to the age of self-entrepreneurial professionalization, grunge held onto the promise of noise at the site of the body.

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Chris Townsend: Video Games for Transcendentalists

Chris Townsend: Video Games for Transcendentalists

The University of Southern California’s “Game Innovation Lab” recently made the press with its adaptation of Henry David Thoreau’s autobiographical work of philosophy, Walden.

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On the Knocking at the Gate, in Macbeth

On the Knocking at the Gate, in Macbeth

From my boyish days I had always felt a great perplexity on one point in Macbeth. It was this: the knocking at the gate, which succeeds to the murder of Duncan.

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Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Protest

Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Protest

In some ways, I feel I shouldn’t go there, so naturally I am drawn like a moth to the flame. I can’t get around race and identity politics, and I shouldn’t. But as deliciously pearly white as I am—and given that it’s ipso facto my “identity”—I have still never...

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Ed Simon on The Tragedy of Dracule

Ed Simon on The Tragedy of Dracule

Mathias Blum writes in Akiva’s Garden that “No play in the Renaissance canon, no play in the English canon, no play in literature is as terrifying as The Tragedy of Dracule

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Sarah Murphy: Millennial at the Movies

Sarah Murphy: Millennial at the Movies

In a cinema in Hackney, watching the first scene of La La Land, I witnessed a curious thing happen to the audience around me.

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Little, Chiron, Black

Little, Chiron, Black

Did I ever imagine, during my anxious, closeted childhood, that I’d live long enough to see a movie like “Moonlight,” Barry Jenkins’s brilliant, achingly alive new work about black queerness?

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GOOD LUCK.

GOOD LUCK.

Few exhibitions have been as anticipated as the current Francis Picabia retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.

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Anti-Archive

Anti-Archive

Page has been making annual trips to the Texas-Mexico borderlands since 2007, and one of her projects is walking along the river in search of objects people leave behind when they’re crossing.

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Maybe these pills can do the trick?

Maybe these pills can do the trick?

by Steve Mentz Motion disorients bodies. When they are moved, bodies seek stable refuge—whether the bodies in question comprise shipwrecked sailors, strife-torn nations, dislocated asylum-seekers, or even confused students. Poetry offers a partial, not always effective, response to motion sickness. In disorienting times and places, we imagine refuge—while not averting...

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Starman

Starman

Bowie in Los Angeles was a kind of mantic probe for young kids discovering the joy of sex, sexuality, art, artiness. He was going into areas that no one had really explored before.

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Colin Raff: Cross-Sections of the False Narcissus

Colin Raff: Cross-Sections of the False Narcissus

Flourishing in the northern provinces, the Balkan False Narcissus (Crinum ponticum) stands out as one of Euxinova’s most notable bulbous perennials.

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Our perspective never changes…

Our perspective never changes…

I think the main reason for my aversion to the theater is the cinema.

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Daniel Harris: Alien Invasions

Daniel Harris: Alien Invasions

Films and novels usually portray alien invasions, not simply as instances of tribal aggression on the part of such phrenological curiosities as the Klingons in Star Trek or the Sith Lords in Star Wars, but as evacuations from dying planets.

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