Berfrois

Maybe these pills can do the trick?

Maybe these pills can do the trick?

by Steve Mentz Motion disorients bodies. When they are moved, bodies seek stable refuge—whether the bodies in question comprise shipwrecked sailors, strife-torn nations, dislocated asylum-seekers, or even confused students. Poetry offers a partial, not always effective, response to motion sickness. In disorienting times and places, we imagine refuge—while not averting our eyes from roiling seas. Dislocation…

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Starman

Starman

Bowie in Los Angeles was a kind of mantic probe for young kids discovering the joy of sex, sexuality, art, artiness. He was going into areas that no one had really explored before.

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Colin Raff: Cross-Sections of the False Narcissus

Colin Raff: Cross-Sections of the False Narcissus

Flourishing in the northern provinces, the Balkan False Narcissus (Crinum ponticum) stands out as one of Euxinova’s most notable bulbous perennials.

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Our perspective never changes…

Our perspective never changes…

I think the main reason for my aversion to the theater is the cinema.

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Daniel Harris: Alien Invasions

Daniel Harris: Alien Invasions

Films and novels usually portray alien invasions, not simply as instances of tribal aggression on the part of such phrenological curiosities as the Klingons in Star Trek or the Sith Lords in Star Wars, but as evacuations from dying planets.

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Aria Dean: #WanderingWILDING

Aria Dean: #WanderingWILDING

It’s easiest to start from the impulse to problematize the position of the flâneur. The ugly word privilege hovers around it, and we turn to questions that we know the answer to, “Who, exactly, is allowed to wander, like so?”

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A Berlin Teaparty

A Berlin Teaparty

We’re co-hosting an opening night party for Colin Raff’s latest art installation. Hope to see you there!

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Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss the Apocalypse

Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss the Apocalypse

The question is not whether humans are on a crash course with misery and extinction but how we as individuals relate to our membership in a species and chart a path for ourselves between now and our personal demise.

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Ed Simon on Bob Dylan

Ed Simon on Bob Dylan

There is no living American poet who deserves the characterization of being a prophet more than Bob Dylan. Both a product of his land and his land a product of him, Dylan the prophet has been Jeremiah by the rivers of Babylon

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Laura Minor on Fleabag

Laura Minor on Fleabag

British writer and actor, Phoebe Waller-Bridge, writes and stars in television series Fleabag. Waller-Bridge's character is unnamed throughout the episodes, though the viewer is meant to directly conjure the this soul-infested heroine.

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Elisa Veini on the Tango

Elisa Veini on the Tango

I have to admit, the tango was no evident musical choice for a film about a Belgian pub. One would rather expect to hear schlagers or chansons, exactly what we tried to do, but somehow they did not fit in, or perhaps they fitted just too well.

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Nightcrawling

Nightcrawling

If Tim Lawrence had wanted his third book, “Life and Death on the New York Dance Floor, 1980-1983,” to go pop, he would have titled it “The World That Made Madonna,” picked a different cover, and added a chapter or two focusing on her.

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Joe Linker on the Whiskey (Radish)

Joe Linker on the Whiskey (Radish)

by Joe Linker To my odd ears, usquebaugh, from which whiskey derives, reminds me of the wedding party that year in Berkeley, and he…, and he couldn’t say…, or, he could not pronounce…, but that was nothing to the question of how he got the overstuffed hotel room chair...

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Back to Honey by Lital Khaikin

Back to Honey by Lital Khaikin

The world’s oldest documented love poem: Sumer tablet, 8th century BC. Istanbul Archaeological Museum. by Lital Khaikin Notes departing from Deniz Eroglu’s exhibition “Milk & Honey” @ OVERGADEN * I would not call him a lover The man who craves God’s Paradise. Paradise is only a trap To...

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‘Prince was a light, a star, a beacon’

‘Prince was a light, a star, a beacon’

The death of Prince Rogers Nelson, grandchile of Louisiana Creoles, occurred on April 21st, 2016, just about at the end of the semester for my friends, my students and I, in academia.

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Captioning the Sitters by Volker M. Welter

Captioning the Sitters by Volker M. Welter

Judging by the crowd, of which I was part when recently visiting London’s National Portrait Gallery, the attraction of portrait painting is undiminished.

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Bosch’s imagination ranged from a place beyond the spheres of Heaven to the uttermost depths of Hell…

Bosch’s imagination ranged from a place beyond the spheres of Heaven to the uttermost depths of Hell…

There has never been a painter quite like Jheronimus van Aken, the Flemish master who signed his works as Jheronimus Bosch.

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Oscar Wilde: Art’s Rough Material

Oscar Wilde: Art’s Rough Material

People tell us that Art makes us love Nature more than we loved her before; that it reveals her secrets to us; and that after a careful study of Corot and Constable we see things in her that had escaped our observation.

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Stanimir Panayotov on Krassimir Terziev

Stanimir Panayotov on Krassimir Terziev

A Message from Space in my Backyard, 2009, dual channel video installation, view from the exhibition Territories of the In/Human, Württembergischer Kunstverein, Stuttgart, 2010 by Stanimir Panayotov Krassimir Terziev, Between the Past that is About to Happen and the Future that Has Already Been, translated into English by Lyubov Kostova,...

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Robyn Ferrell: Freedom’s Formula

Robyn Ferrell: Freedom’s Formula

‘The Future is Here – it is just not evenly distributed’ was the catch phrase for the Sydney Biennale, which closed this month. But the experience on offer forecasted an uneven future for a widely distributed art product.

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