Berfrois

Gustav Wunderwald’s Weimar Berlin

Gustav Wunderwald’s Weimar Berlin

In spite of the wholesale destruction of the city during the Second World War, it is still possible to visit some of the streets that Wunderwald painted in the 1920s, and recognise the scenes he depicted.

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GOOD LUCK.

GOOD LUCK.

Few exhibitions have been as anticipated as the current Francis Picabia retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.

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Anti-Archive

Anti-Archive

Page has been making annual trips to the Texas-Mexico borderlands since 2007, and one of her projects is walking along the river in search of objects people leave behind when they’re crossing.

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Colin Raff: Cross-Sections of the False Narcissus

Colin Raff: Cross-Sections of the False Narcissus

Flourishing in the northern provinces, the Balkan False Narcissus (Crinum ponticum) stands out as one of Euxinova’s most notable bulbous perennials.

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Aria Dean: #WanderingWILDING

Aria Dean: #WanderingWILDING

It’s easiest to start from the impulse to problematize the position of the flâneur. The ugly word privilege hovers around it, and we turn to questions that we know the answer to, “Who, exactly, is allowed to wander, like so?”

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A Berlin Teaparty

A Berlin Teaparty

We’re co-hosting an opening night party for Colin Raff’s latest art installation. Hope to see you there!

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Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss the Apocalypse

Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss the Apocalypse

The question is not whether humans are on a crash course with misery and extinction but how we as individuals relate to our membership in a species and chart a path for ourselves between now and our personal demise.

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Joe Linker on the Whiskey (Radish)

Joe Linker on the Whiskey (Radish)

by Joe Linker To my odd ears, usquebaugh, from which whiskey derives, reminds me of the wedding party that year in Berkeley, and he…, and he couldn’t say…, or, he could not pronounce…, but that was nothing to the question of how he got the overstuffed hotel room chair...

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Back to Honey by Lital Khaikin

Back to Honey by Lital Khaikin

The world’s oldest documented love poem: Sumer tablet, 8th century BC. Istanbul Archaeological Museum. by Lital Khaikin Notes departing from Deniz Eroglu’s exhibition “Milk & Honey” @ OVERGADEN * I would not call him a lover The man who craves God’s Paradise. Paradise is only a trap To...

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Captioning the Sitters by Volker M. Welter

Captioning the Sitters by Volker M. Welter

Judging by the crowd, of which I was part when recently visiting London’s National Portrait Gallery, the attraction of portrait painting is undiminished.

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Oscar Wilde: Art’s Rough Material

Oscar Wilde: Art’s Rough Material

People tell us that Art makes us love Nature more than we loved her before; that it reveals her secrets to us; and that after a careful study of Corot and Constable we see things in her that had escaped our observation.

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Stanimir Panayotov on Krassimir Terziev

Stanimir Panayotov on Krassimir Terziev

A Message from Space in my Backyard, 2009, dual channel video installation, view from the exhibition Territories of the In/Human, Württembergischer Kunstverein, Stuttgart, 2010 by Stanimir Panayotov Krassimir Terziev, Between the Past that is About to Happen and the Future that Has Already Been, translated into English by Lyubov Kostova,...

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Robyn Ferrell: Freedom’s Formula

Robyn Ferrell: Freedom’s Formula

‘The Future is Here – it is just not evenly distributed’ was the catch phrase for the Sydney Biennale, which closed this month. But the experience on offer forecasted an uneven future for a widely distributed art product.

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Destroyed Human Bodies

Destroyed Human Bodies

I will try to clarify, in eight points, why it is important—today—to look at images of destroyed human bodies like those I have used and integrated in different works.

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Seven, Eleven

Seven, Eleven

The established tale of mid-century abstract painting in this country relies on two parallel narratives, each originating from either side of Canada’s two solitudes. In Montreal, it was the story of the Automatistes, of Borduas and Riopelle, Barbeau and Françoise Sullivan.

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Robyn Ferrell on Julia Margaret Cameron

Robyn Ferrell on Julia Margaret Cameron

The rise of a woman photographer with the advent of photography and of women’s emancipation presents an irresistible moment of reflection.

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Goya With Doctor Arrieta

Goya With Doctor Arrieta

The last room of the exhibition gathers together portraits of friends and exiles done in Bordeaux, and puts at the centre the masterpiece Goya painted in 1820, Self-Portrait with Doctor Arrieta. It is the show’s most daunting moment.

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