Berfrois

Everybody Draw the Dinosaur

Everybody Draw the Dinosaur

What colour was a Tyrannosaurus rex? How did an Archaeopteryx court a mate? And how do you paint the visual likeness of something no human eye...

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Colin Raff: Slivers, Torpid

Colin Raff: Slivers, Torpid

Here the story shifts focus to Grunduline, who, having sung an air describing her flight from the convent, arrives in Vadtstul to find her groom-to-be embracing her mother...

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‘Isn’t Cézanne’s art precisely about not knowing?’

‘Isn’t Cézanne’s art precisely about not knowing?’

Woman with a Cafetière, Paul Cézanne, c.1895 From London Review of Books: The critics all seem to know, or think they know, what ‘as if they were apples’ means – what apples are like, and what painting them consists of, technically and temperamentally. But isn’t Cézanne’s art precisely about not knowing? Painting,...

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Dalston Loverboy Takes Over Greenwich by Paul Johnathan

Dalston Loverboy Takes Over Greenwich by Paul Johnathan

Charles Jeffrey moved from Glasgow to London to study fashion at Central Saint Martins. He soon ran out of cash, propelling him to start LOVERBOY...

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Heady intimacy enjoyed in the arid Mexican desert…

Heady intimacy enjoyed in the arid Mexican desert…

To look at surrealist art is to see female bodies in pieces. Here a disembodied leg, there a mysterious eye.

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Ludwig II’s Neuschwanstein remains perhaps the world’s greatest work of fan art…

Ludwig II’s Neuschwanstein remains perhaps the world’s greatest work of fan art…

No cars are permitted to drive the path that winds up the mountain. In fair weather, as now in late April, buses and horse-drawn carriages...

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Jeremy Woolsey on Tsuyoshi Ozawa

Jeremy Woolsey on Tsuyoshi Ozawa

At best, art movements in Japan lead back over and over again to the same spot in oblivion— one that prevents Japanese and Western art...

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Kirkus Reviews Reviewed

Kirkus Reviews Reviewed

Kirkus Reviews is a magazine, though few readers of its work have ever seen a copy. Like the Michelin guides, it’s known for verdicts spread across the publishing world, bringing good books to first attention and helping to sweep aside huge piles of dross.

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Colin Raff: Variations on a Brandenburg Salamander

Colin Raff: Variations on a Brandenburg Salamander

In the spring of 1793, the entomologist Johann Friedrich Wilhelm Herbst, as a means to supplement his lectures at the newly founded Berliner Tierarzneischule

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Gustav Wunderwald’s Weimar Berlin

Gustav Wunderwald’s Weimar Berlin

In spite of the wholesale destruction of the city during the Second World War, it is still possible to visit some of the streets that Wunderwald painted in the 1920s, and recognise the scenes he depicted.

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GOOD LUCK.

GOOD LUCK.

Few exhibitions have been as anticipated as the current Francis Picabia retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.

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Anti-Archive

Anti-Archive

Page has been making annual trips to the Texas-Mexico borderlands since 2007, and one of her projects is walking along the river in search of objects people leave behind when they’re crossing.

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Colin Raff: Cross-Sections of the False Narcissus

Colin Raff: Cross-Sections of the False Narcissus

Flourishing in the northern provinces, the Balkan False Narcissus (Crinum ponticum) stands out as one of Euxinova’s most notable bulbous perennials.

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Aria Dean: #WanderingWILDING

Aria Dean: #WanderingWILDING

It’s easiest to start from the impulse to problematize the position of the flâneur. The ugly word privilege hovers around it, and we turn to questions that we know the answer to, “Who, exactly, is allowed to wander, like so?”

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A Berlin Teaparty

A Berlin Teaparty

We’re co-hosting an opening night party for Colin Raff’s latest art installation. Hope to see you there!

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Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss the Apocalypse

Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss the Apocalypse

The question is not whether humans are on a crash course with misery and extinction but how we as individuals relate to our membership in a species and chart a path for ourselves between now and our personal demise.

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Joe Linker on the Whiskey (Radish)

Joe Linker on the Whiskey (Radish)

by Joe Linker To my odd ears, usquebaugh, from which whiskey derives, reminds me of the wedding party that year in Berkeley, and he…, and he couldn’t say…, or, he could not pronounce…, but that was nothing to the question of how he got the overstuffed hotel room chair...

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Back to Honey by Lital Khaikin

Back to Honey by Lital Khaikin

The world’s oldest documented love poem: Sumer tablet, 8th century BC. Istanbul Archaeological Museum. by Lital Khaikin Notes departing from Deniz Eroglu’s exhibition “Milk & Honey” @ OVERGADEN * I would not call him a lover The man who craves God’s Paradise. Paradise is only a trap To...

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