Berfrois

Joseph Spece on Wonder Woman

Joseph Spece on Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman, Warner Bros. Pictures, 2017 by Joseph Spece Reflections on Warner Bros’ Wonder Woman (2017). The lilt and lyric oilpaint technique used to illustrate Hippolyta’s tale of gods and men aspires to be Michelangelo, but succeeds more in being Rubens. And like a Rubens, Wonder Woman has superior plastic form, even if its vision…

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Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Protest

Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Protest

In some ways, I feel I shouldn’t go there, so naturally I am drawn like a moth to the flame. I can’t get around race and identity politics, and I shouldn’t. But as deliciously pearly white as I am—and given that it’s ipso facto my “identity”—I have still never...

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Sarah Murphy: Millennial at the Movies

Sarah Murphy: Millennial at the Movies

In a cinema in Hackney, watching the first scene of La La Land, I witnessed a curious thing happen to the audience around me.

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Little, Chiron, Black

Little, Chiron, Black

Did I ever imagine, during my anxious, closeted childhood, that I’d live long enough to see a movie like “Moonlight,” Barry Jenkins’s brilliant, achingly alive new work about black queerness?

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Our perspective never changes…

Our perspective never changes…

I think the main reason for my aversion to the theater is the cinema.

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Austen Powers

Austen Powers

When I was working on my doctorate at Oxford, I lived in a large Victorian house with about 10 other students. My room was on the ground floor at the back; in the room above me lived a Canadian woman named Lenore—after the “rare and radiant maiden” in Poe’s...

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The milk seemed to taste of bone and blood’

The milk seemed to taste of bone and blood’

Todd Haynes’s film Carol (2015), an adaptation of crime grande dame Patricia Highsmith’s obscure 1952 lesbian romance, The Price of Salt, while sometimes exquisite, is the latest uneasy-making case in point.

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Scott Anthony on Reframing Modernism

Scott Anthony on Reframing Modernism

The outcome of an attention-grabbing and likely expensive collaboration with the Pompidou Centre in Paris, Reframing Modernism is the new National Gallery of Singapore's first blockbuster exhibition.

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Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Meat

Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Meat

In a 60-page essay I wrote on the nature of a “morbid curiosity,” I struggled not only with the ethics of viewing actualities of death found on shock sites—usually, the premature deaths of non-white victims of car crashes, industrial accidents, drug cartel violence.

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Nicholas Rombes on Andrzej Żuławski

Nicholas Rombes on Andrzej Żuławski

Andrzej Żuławski died on February 17 in Warsaw, Poland, less than 300-miles away from where he was born, in Lviv, in 1940.

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Stars Wars said you will die without a father…

Stars Wars said you will die without a father…

Thinking a lot about precarity and magic in '80s American movies lately. Rewatched this scene from The Karate Kid (1984) late last night because I was this boy and because I loved him for so many years.

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Work, Kids, Sex

Work, Kids, Sex

10 PM, Chez Jay. I order two beers for us and a glass of wine for Mona. She’s teaching Middlemarch for the first time on Monday, and though I wrote about it for my undergraduate thesis I remember it very poorly.

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Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Dams

Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Dams

DamNation undoubtedly falls within your category of “contemporary environmentalist pop docs flooding Netflix, with their smooth animated graphics emulating hand drawings, and their nature-porn photography, and their Sufjanian soundtracks.”

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Heather Lang on Gregory Robinson

Heather Lang on Gregory Robinson

American Aristocracy, Triangle Film Corporation, 1916 by Heather Lang The other world is ours, yours and mine, this hazy kingdom of silent film and forgotten Polaroids. – Gregory Robinson The quiet associations between silent movies and prose poems within Gregory Robinson’s unique book, All Movies Love the Moon, are...

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Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Agnès Varda

Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Agnès Varda

Gnomish Agnès Varda, with her mushroom cap of hair dyed the color of a dark, ripe cherry, with her visual groaners—she operates in the spirit of happenstance, fearless of mockery.

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Rising High

Rising High

The screenwriter and director Bruce Robinson, best known for The Killing Fields and Withnail & I, really went to town on the Freudian view of High-Rise in his little-known 1979 script, which he subtitled An Analogy.

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Stanimir Panayotov on Oleg Mavromatti

Stanimir Panayotov on Oleg Mavromatti

Where No Place for Fools leaves no room for fools, it pries open the space for the fool’s room, his contemporary cell: the camera.

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