Berfrois

Joseph Spece on Metroid

Joseph Spece on Metroid

This afternoon I’m nested in a striped comforter, looking out the window at four snowy oaks. In the foreground, the shrivelled leaves of the hydrangea, mostly buried in drifts. The television screen is static, paused on a scene in the game I honor before every other, Metroid.

Read More

Goya With Doctor Arrieta

Goya With Doctor Arrieta

The last room of the exhibition gathers together portraits of friends and exiles done in Bordeaux, and puts at the centre the masterpiece Goya painted in 1820, Self-Portrait with Doctor Arrieta. It is the show’s most daunting moment.

Read More

Many parents feared the necronym was a murderous curse…

Many parents feared the necronym was a murderous curse…

Parsed from the Greek, necronym literally translates as “death name.” It usually means a name shared with a dead sibling.

Read More

Student Pilot 3000

Student Pilot 3000

Futurama frequently presents Fry as useless and undesirable; the series goes out of its way to make sure we understand this point: he’s only got one set of clothes; he loses his teeth from drinking too much Slurm; he is his own grandfather; he can’t kill the last ship...

Read More

Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Agnès Varda

Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Agnès Varda

Gnomish Agnès Varda, with her mushroom cap of hair dyed the color of a dark, ripe cherry, with her visual groaners—she operates in the spirit of happenstance, fearless of mockery.

Read More

Why do artists make stuff?

Why do artists make stuff?

Why do artists make stuff if the familiar criteria of success or failure in the domain of manufacture are not dispositive when it comes to art? Why are artists so bent on making stuff? To what end?

Read More

Rising High

Rising High

The screenwriter and director Bruce Robinson, best known for The Killing Fields and Withnail & I, really went to town on the Freudian view of High-Rise in his little-known 1979 script, which he subtitled An Analogy.

Read More

Stanimir Panayotov on Oleg Mavromatti

Stanimir Panayotov on Oleg Mavromatti

Where No Place for Fools leaves no room for fools, it pries open the space for the fool’s room, his contemporary cell: the camera.

Read More

Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Luc Moullet

Teresa K. Miller and Gregory Giles Discuss Luc Moullet

To begin at the end: After nearly two hours exploring facets of exploitation in the globalized food system, Luc Moullet closes Genèse d’un repas/Origins of a Meal (1978) by turning the camera on himself.

Read More

Nicholas Rombes on Wes Craven

Nicholas Rombes on Wes Craven

Wes Craven’s movies were about movies, even when they weren’t. And in this sense they helped bring cinema back to its self-reflective origins.

Read More

“This was no Well of Loneliness”

“This was no Well of Loneliness”

Around that same time I think I read the whole Ladies Almanack in my studio, across the hall from Daviel. I asked her to let me know if she wanted to make that film. She told me the whole wish: the dream of Cixous, and Myles narrating; everything.

Read More

Chris Moffat on Anand Patwardhan

Chris Moffat on Anand Patwardhan

Patwardhan both captures and manifests this wavering time of modern India: history exists in his films not as a static object for reflection, nostalgia or mourning, but as something which constantly returns, flashing up, animating politics and inflecting horizons of possibility in the present.

Read More

Yudit Kiss on Amar Kanwar

Yudit Kiss on Amar Kanwar

Amar Kanwar wants us to see what most of us prefer not to see: destruction and suffering caused by social injustice and violence fuelled by poisonous racist ideologies, political power battles and corporate greed. It’s not that his images are particularly hard to see.

Read More

Free Art From Oil

Free Art From Oil

Museums and galleries weren’t always the grand institutions we experience today. Formerly private collections, visible only to the ruling classes, were projected into the lower echelons of society in grand acts of philanthropy.

Read More

The absence of crystals seemed to bewilder some of the more serious fans of the series…

The absence of crystals seemed to bewilder some of the more serious fans of the series…

Even back in 1994, the Final Fantasy series was settling into the sort of routine for which it later became well known – and was often scorned for.

Read More

“J.M. Coetzee”

“J.M. Coetzee”

On 21 December, 2012, I had the privilege of introducing J.M. Coetzee to an expectant audience at the University of Cape Town; he was about to read from his new, as yet unpublished work, The Childhood of Jesus.

Read More