Berfrois

Marianne Moore was a passionate reviser…

Marianne Moore was a passionate reviser…

From The Nation: Moore was born near St. Louis, Missouri, in 1887. Her parents separated before her birth, and subsequently her father, already institutionalized, severed his hand, taking literally the injunction of Matthew 5:30 (“If thy right hand offend thee, cut it off”). To her mother and her brother Warner, who became a Presbyterian minister, Moore…

Read More

The Poetry Prize

The Poetry Prize

I was a micro-celebrity on campus. It is comforting to people to know that the poet among them is not a fraud, and to have that knowledge gifted without the burden of having to actually read poems.

Read More

Can we divorce ourselves from nepotism?

Can we divorce ourselves from nepotism?

I hover my mouse over the “send” button before finally making the motion and clicking. It’s done. I have told these widely published writers their submissions will not be accepted for this particular publication.

Read More

Halo-Child

Halo-Child

C.D. Wright—she was a force. I felt her force as soon as my future husband at the time gave me a copy of Cooling Time

Read More

‘What does it mean to be held by rhythm?’

‘What does it mean to be held by rhythm?’

What I have been thinking about of late is how those first lyric poets were trying to invent ways to express human life in the various beats, pops, and hums of language (the part of the music we still have some scraps of).

Read More

‘You can spend your whole life thinking of death’

‘You can spend your whole life thinking of death’

You can spend your whole life thinking of death. Or soaring from it. My father was the opposite of Glück’s — steeped instead in the earthly, the decimal point, and the profit margin.

Read More

Two Lines of Poetic Development

Two Lines of Poetic Development

What seems to me chiefly remarkable in the popular conception of a Poet is its unlikeness to the truth. Misconception in this case has been flattered, I fear, by the poets themselves.

Read More

The Goethezeit

The Goethezeit

If he hadn’t lived from 1749 to 1832, safely into the modern era and the age of print, but had instead flourished when Shakespeare did, there would certainly be scholars today theorizing that the life and work of half a dozen men had been combined under Goethe’s name.

Read More

Tui

Tui

Here are some words I’ve been writing down recently: Mingimingi. Ponga. Horoeka. Titoki.

Read More

An ecopoem is urgent, it aims to unsettle…

An ecopoem is urgent, it aims to unsettle…

A familiar argument against didactic poetry is that it preaches to the choir. A poem should not preach, but it may teach the choir a new tune, the chorus a new step.

Read More