Berfrois

Marianne Moore was a passionate reviser…

Marianne Moore was a passionate reviser…

From The Nation: Moore was born near St. Louis, Missouri, in 1887. Her parents separated before her birth, and subsequently her father, already institutionalized, severed his hand, taking literally the injunction of Matthew 5:30 (“If thy right hand offend thee, cut it off”). To her mother and her brother Warner,...

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The Poetry Prize

The Poetry Prize

I was a micro-celebrity on campus. It is comforting to people to know that the poet among them is not a fraud, and to have that knowledge gifted without the burden of having to actually read poems.

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Can we divorce ourselves from nepotism?

Can we divorce ourselves from nepotism?

I hover my mouse over the “send” button before finally making the motion and clicking. It’s done. I have told these widely published writers their submissions will not be accepted for this particular publication.

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Halo-Child

Halo-Child

C.D. Wright—she was a force. I felt her force as soon as my future husband at the time gave me a copy of Cooling Time

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The bread, the wine…

The bread, the wine…

The lapse in marital fidelity in ‘Online’ is one of the many instances of complicated relationships in the book, in which most are strained or not quite realised.

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You must have made yourself alone to be able to write at all…

You must have made yourself alone to be able to write at all…

It has been said by very many people that there is a tangible pleasure in the mere act of writing: in choosing and arranging words. It has been denied by many.

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‘What does it mean to be held by rhythm?’

‘What does it mean to be held by rhythm?’

What I have been thinking about of late is how those first lyric poets were trying to invent ways to express human life in the various beats, pops, and hums of language (the part of the music we still have some scraps of).

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To the Teahouse!

To the Teahouse!

You know that you're writing poems that are like no-one else's. I'd love to help show that to readers.

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Janice Lee: Depression, Denial, Depression

Janice Lee: Depression, Denial, Depression

I want to confess here that I have often worked to put a distance between myself and the past. I want to confess, too, that I have recently and often thought about the ease with which I could escape all the misery of this world, singular gestures, without memory...

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Fox, Shagger

Fox, Shagger

From London Review of Books: Like his hero Robert Graves, Hughes tirelessly pursued the White Goddess, or the Goddess of Complete Being as he called her in his study of Shakespeare, both in his imagination and in the forms that she assumed in the women whom he met and slept...

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Gravity’s Relativism

Gravity’s Relativism

How to relate philosophical thought to literary practice? And, conversely, how to illuminate issues presented in narrative literature by having recourse to systems of philosophy? These are the two preeminent questions that Martin Paul Eve asks himself and answers impressively in his recent study Pynchon and Philosophy: Wittgenstein, Foucault...

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‘You can spend your whole life thinking of death’

‘You can spend your whole life thinking of death’

You can spend your whole life thinking of death. Or soaring from it. My father was the opposite of Glück’s — steeped instead in the earthly, the decimal point, and the profit margin.

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As dead as the rabbits and guinea-pigs with whom they once had tea?

As dead as the rabbits and guinea-pigs with whom they once had tea?

It may seem curious to begin with Dante and pass on to the Children’s Rabbits’ House; but I require both to explain what it is I mean by Limbo; no such easy matter on trying.

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