Berfrois

Ed Simon: Elsewheres

Ed Simon: Elsewheres

What do you think Ishmael’s life is like after the last page of Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick? What ultimately happens to that survivor of the ill-fated Pequod? Where does he go, what does he do, how does he end his days? The “scandal of fiction” is that although these questions make sense, they are meaningless.

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Insert Slogan:

Insert Slogan:

Sometime in the summer of 1987 I walked out to our rural-route mailbox and found my membership card for the Young Socialist Alliance, accompanied by a typewritten letter filled with both practical information as well as elevated rhetoric about the youth being the future.

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Precariousness is quite simply the condition of the working class under capitalism…

Precariousness is quite simply the condition of the working class under capitalism…

The terms ‘precarity’ and its derivation, ‘precariat’/precariato gained notoriety after the 2001 Euro May Day parade when a network of casual workers, students, migrants, feminists, LGBT activists

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Ed Simon on Thomas More

Ed Simon on Thomas More

The Garden of Earthly Delights, Hieronymus Bosch, 1490-1510 by Ed Simon For its name literally meaning “No Place,” echoes of Utopia seem to be everywhere. Early autumn and a week before the pope’s visit and I am at the corner of 53rd and 5th, halfway between St. Patrick’s Cathedral...

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Wary of the They

Wary of the They

Elon Musk, the billionaire inventor and amateur futurologue, has recently taken to the idea that we may all be living in a simulation akin to Second Life. He has been influenced in his thinking by the philosopher Nick Bostrom.

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Menachem Feuer on Rachel Cantor

Menachem Feuer on Rachel Cantor

Dante meets Beatrice at Ponte Santa Trinita, Henry Holiday, 1883 by Menachem Feuer Good on Paper, by Rachel Cantor New York: Melville House, 299 pp. I didn’t love those who could love me, I loved the candle….I here and I there, I companioned perhaps – now! – by the love of...

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Go Over by M. Munro

Go Over by M. Munro

“If you only followed the parables,” it has been written, “you yourselves would become parables.” How is one to understand “follow” here?

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Prometheus Onward

Prometheus Onward

When Albert Camus said on the evening of December 12, 1957, “I have not yet given my opinion about Algeria, but I will if you ask me,” he was making an offer that students at the University of Stockholm could not refuse.

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‘Plato is not famous for answering questions but for staking his life on the chance to ask them’

‘Plato is not famous for answering questions but for staking his life on the chance to ask them’

We are on the verge of becoming the best trained, and least educated, society since the Romans — and reducing the humanities to a type of soft science will only hasten this trend.

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Stuart Elden: Michel

Stuart Elden: Michel

Foucault’s Last Decade is a study of Foucault’s work between 1974 and his death in 1984. In 1974, Foucault began writing the first volume of his History of Sexuality, developing work he had already begun to present in his Collège de France lecture courses.

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May Upheavals by M. Munro

May Upheavals by M. Munro

“Either ethics makes no sense at all,” Gilles Deleuze once wrote, “or this is what it means and has nothing else to say: not to be unworthy of what happens to us.”

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Three Literary Freaks

Three Literary Freaks

Victor Hugo. Portrait by Edmond Bacot, 1862 From Verso Books: There are three kinds of conception of the novelistic. There is what we could call the official lineage, which the academy presents as the history of the French novel, proceeding by way of Stendhal and Flaubert. Here, the novel is...

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Joel Gn on Jeff Nunokawa

Joel Gn on Jeff Nunokawa

by Joel Gn Note Book, by Jeff Nunokawa, Princeton University Press, 360pp. Reading aphorisms can prove to be an arduous, if not dangerous undertaking. Enigmatic, indifferent and occasionally, a little too precarious, these vignettes adroitly traverse and inhabit a myriad of texts, people and places. We can never be...

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iii. Ch. 9

iii. Ch. 9

by Cosana Eram Those who like anniversaries—and I am one of them—have recently celebrated Michel de Montaigne’s birthday (on 28 February), a reason to revel in the quality of his writing and thought. The buzz started in the summer of 2015 when Philosophie Magazine Hors-Série featured several contemporary French thinkers...

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Four Raw Stones

Four Raw Stones

We’re yelling at each other over the phone. He says he’s at work and only has minutes before he has to teach. It’s essentially a break up of a relationship that never starts or finishes. That is already deep in motion, but has only ever been called a friendship.

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Jeremy Fernando: Apertures

Jeremy Fernando: Apertures

by Jeremy Fernando … one is photographable, ‘photogenic’, and this is perhaps the catastrophe, that one can be photographable, that one can be captured and caught in time … — Hubertus von Amelunxen … the tragedy of the photographic object, the object that is photographed: that in order to preserve...

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Sebastian Normandin: Advaita

Sebastian Normandin: Advaita

I’m in India. Or at least that’s what my perceptual experience, consciousness, and mind are telling me. It’s hard to know for sure. The reason I have doubts surrounds the immateriality of my being here, and moreover, the immateriality of India itself.

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^!

^!

Photograph by Tom Page by Justin E. H. Smith An official reform of French spelling was recently announced, causing no small uproar on the Internet, and presumably in real life too (I don’t really talk to people), as to whether this is good or bad. There were three broad...

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Fire and Story

Fire and Story

A naturally occurring phenomenon in philosophy is that the key concept, the one whose weight is greatest and thus whose gravity is strongest—eidos in Plato, cogito in Descartes, Dasein in Heidegger—is all but untranslatable

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