Berfrois

Ed Simon on the Whiskey Rebellion

Ed Simon on the Whiskey Rebellion

Herman Husband – itinerant preacher, politician, regulator, radical – would amble among the woods surrounding Pittsburgh. Here on the trans-Appalachian frontier, the native North Carolinian with his shoddy patchwork clothes and with his biblically long beard.

Read More

May Upheavals by M. Munro

May Upheavals by M. Munro

“Either ethics makes no sense at all,” Gilles Deleuze once wrote, “or this is what it means and has nothing else to say: not to be unworthy of what happens to us.”

Read More

Three Literary Freaks

Three Literary Freaks

Victor Hugo. Portrait by Edmond Bacot, 1862 From Verso Books: There are three kinds of conception of the novelistic. There is what we could call the official lineage, which the academy presents as the history of the French novel, proceeding by way of Stendhal and Flaubert. Here, the novel is...

Read More

Joel Gn on Jeff Nunokawa

Joel Gn on Jeff Nunokawa

by Joel Gn Note Book, by Jeff Nunokawa, Princeton University Press, 360pp. Reading aphorisms can prove to be an arduous, if not dangerous undertaking. Enigmatic, indifferent and occasionally, a little too precarious, these vignettes adroitly traverse and inhabit a myriad of texts, people and places. We can never be...

Read More

iii. Ch. 9

iii. Ch. 9

by Cosana Eram Those who like anniversaries—and I am one of them—have recently celebrated Michel de Montaigne’s birthday (on 28 February), a reason to revel in the quality of his writing and thought. The buzz started in the summer of 2015 when Philosophie Magazine Hors-Série featured several contemporary French thinkers...

Read More

Four Raw Stones

Four Raw Stones

We’re yelling at each other over the phone. He says he’s at work and only has minutes before he has to teach. It’s essentially a break up of a relationship that never starts or finishes. That is already deep in motion, but has only ever been called a friendship.

Read More

Jeremy Fernando: Apertures

Jeremy Fernando: Apertures

by Jeremy Fernando … one is photographable, ‘photogenic’, and this is perhaps the catastrophe, that one can be photographable, that one can be captured and caught in time … — Hubertus von Amelunxen … the tragedy of the photographic object, the object that is photographed: that in order to preserve...

Read More

Sebastian Normandin: Advaita

Sebastian Normandin: Advaita

I’m in India. Or at least that’s what my perceptual experience, consciousness, and mind are telling me. It’s hard to know for sure. The reason I have doubts surrounds the immateriality of my being here, and moreover, the immateriality of India itself.

Read More

^!

^!

Photograph by Tom Page by Justin E. H. Smith An official reform of French spelling was recently announced, causing no small uproar on the Internet, and presumably in real life too (I don’t really talk to people), as to whether this is good or bad. There were three broad...

Read More

Fire and Story

Fire and Story

A naturally occurring phenomenon in philosophy is that the key concept, the one whose weight is greatest and thus whose gravity is strongest—eidos in Plato, cogito in Descartes, Dasein in Heidegger—is all but untranslatable

Read More

The left and right alike have misunderstood deconstruction…

The left and right alike have misunderstood deconstruction…

Over the past four decades, scholars in the American humanities have used deconstruction — a style of interpretation pioneered by the French philosopher Jacques Derrida.

Read More

‘Philosophy began with Socrates wandering’

‘Philosophy began with Socrates wandering’

Many newspapers have regular columns on science. But few of these columns are dedicated to a discussion of the nature or purpose of science. Almost all newspapers have regular pages devoted to sport.

Read More

Catherine Wilson: Live Unknown

Catherine Wilson: Live Unknown

Here I will enter a plea for Epicureanism as an equally serious –and in many ways more adequate moral—philosophy. First, a sketch of the principal doctrines and later influence of the School.

Read More

Let’s Get Digital

Let’s Get Digital

Approaching the work of François Laruelle is a singularly disorientating experience. Billed in marketing blurbs and encyclopedia entries as a “philosopher,” Laruelle is difficult to place.

Read More

Is loneliness a contingent state?

Is loneliness a contingent state?

You might think that loneliness is a contingent state: people feel lonely for a time or lonely in a place, and some people are constitutionally lonely, but most people are not lonely all the time and human life is not necessarily lonely.

Read More

They blaze hot and then enter a fallow time…

They blaze hot and then enter a fallow time…

I have a childhood friend who is just a tiny bit younger than me but always so much younger, her skin never showing her age, her cheek marked with a birthmark so Hawthornian it seemed impossible ever to finish looking at her.

Read More

Write in the Future by M. Munro

Write in the Future by M. Munro

The Confusion of Tongues, Gustave Doré, 1865 by M. Munro I. Dichtung und Wahrheit Strictly speaking, does not thought—or the act of thinking—always have the capacity for operating like a foreign language? —Rey Chow Philosophie dürfte man eigentlich nur dichten. Wittgenstein’s imperative translates, “very roughly,” “Philosophy ought really to...

Read More

Defending Imagination

Defending Imagination

A civil war in Syria has, since it began in 2011, gradually radiated out to implicate nearly ever major global actor.

Read More

Wesley A. Kort on C.S. Lewis

Wesley A. Kort on C.S. Lewis

My interest in the works of C. S. Lewis was occasioned less by having read it than by the strongly divided opinions of it among his readers.

Read More