Berfrois

The Long Civil Rights Movement

The Long Civil Rights Movement

This Is Not Dixie: Racist Violence in Kansas, 1861-1927 is a compelling and exhaustive work that examines the long history of anti-black violence and racism in Kansas...

Read More

“Insurrection” and Black Citizens

“Insurrection” and Black Citizens

The very terminology—“black citizen”—was, of course, an oxymoron upon the birth of this very nation...

Read More

Red London

Red London

Conventional accounts of London’s history concentrate on the ‘two cities’—twin centres of wealth and power, each with its monumental buildings...

Read More

Mass Mahatma

Mass Mahatma

Talat Ahmed’s political biography of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi’s life is a welcome addition to the existing literature attempting to theorize his principles of nonviolence...

Read More

In Soviet Russia, food cooks you!

In Soviet Russia, food cooks you!

Food is a window into any culture. In Soviet society, gender and food were always tightly interconnected, which looks like an ideal representation of the ambiguous nature of Communist ideology...

Read More

‘Florida was not to be outdone by any state, in particular California’

‘Florida was not to be outdone by any state, in particular California’

David J. Nelson challenges the notion that the Great Depression helped rather than hurt tourism in Florida.

Read More

Ed Simon: An Appointment with Father Grandier

Ed Simon: An Appointment with Father Grandier

One spring day in 1629, legions of devils came to call upon Father Urbain Grandier. If we’re to believe his accusers, the priest respond with enthusiasm at the arrival of his demonic charge.

Read More

Green Thumbs

Green Thumbs

Not long after he arrived in Machilipatnam, Thomas Bowrey began to wonder what it was that the people of Machilipatnam were smoking.

Read More

A hurricane across the green fields of life…

A hurricane across the green fields of life…

A little over one hundred years ago, a novel virus emerged from an unknown animal reservoir and seeded itself silently in settlements around the world.

Read More

Freelancing Dorothy Parker

Freelancing Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker lost her job as Vanity Fair theater critic on January 11, 1920, in the tea room of the Plaza Hotel. Parker must have known there was trouble brewing as she sat down across from editor Frank Crowninshield.

Read More

Trauma in Motherwell

Trauma in Motherwell

John and Winifred met, and had their miscegenated, crossborder romance, because of the war. Without the war, I was always told, I wouldn’t have existed.

Read More

Work Is Work

Work Is Work

Why do we work? Many of us might give a simple transactional answer to the question: we work in order to make money. For the American psychologist Abraham Maslow

Read More

The Salvors! In an Adventure With Marine Archaeologists!

The Salvors! In an Adventure With Marine Archaeologists!

In May 2016, a salvor named Bobby Pritchett, president of Global Marine Exploration (GME) in Tampa, Florida, announced that he had discovered scattered remains of a ship buried a kilometer off Cape Canaveral

Read More

Gone Gentrified

Gone Gentrified

In her introduction to London: Aspects of Change (1964), Ruth Glass wrote that the city was “too vast, too complex, too contrary and too moody” to be known entirely.

Read More

Meaningful Freedom: How Africa Responded to Independence

Meaningful Freedom: How Africa Responded to Independence

In African Freedom, Phyllis Taoua offers a study of “meaningful freedom” in Africa since independence from the perspective of literary studies...

Read More

Scurvy was the chief threat at sea…

Scurvy was the chief threat at sea…

A Still Life Of A Wanli Kraak Porcelain Bowl Of Citrus Fruit And Pomegranates On A Wooden Table, Jacob van Hulsdonck, 1608-1647 by Jonathan Lamb Serious medical interest in scurvy coincided with what Burke named the unrolling of the map of mankind, the so-called discovery of the land and...

Read More

On Valdis Āboliņš

On Valdis Āboliņš

This book tells the unlikely story of a Latvian-born ex-patriot, Valdis Āboliņš (1939-84), exiled to Germany during World War II and remaining there after the war

Read More

“Life found a way!”

“Life found a way!”

In Mark Twain’s Letters from the Earth, God gathers the archangels and announces that He has made animals. Satan—who else?—asks, “What are they for?”

Read More

A History of Leprosy and Japan

A History of Leprosy and Japan

Though surely unintentional on the part of the author, the timing of the book’s publication, the first English-language monograph on Japan’s history of leprosy, could not have been better.

Read More

Keith Doubt: Peter Handke in Serbia

Keith Doubt: Peter Handke in Serbia

If Handke bears witness on behalf of the people of Serbia, how does he do so? What is the self-consciousness Handke ascribes to the Serbian people?

Read More

Silencing the Bomb

Silencing the Bomb

In Silencing the Bomb: One Scientist’s Quest to Halt Nuclear Testing, Lynn Sykes offers a fascinating look at the time and effort it took for states, during and after the Cold War, to agree...

Read More