Berfrois

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Fire and Story

Fire and Story

A naturally occurring phenomenon in philosophy is that the key concept, the one whose weight is greatest and thus whose gravity is strongest—eidos in Plato, cogito in Descartes, Dasein in Heidegger—is all but untranslatable

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Gerardo Muñoz: Latinamericanism

Gerardo Muñoz: Latinamericanism

In spite of its simplicity and methodical pragmatism, Charles Hatfield’s Limits of identity: Politics and Poetics in Latin America is an ambitious and systematic effort to dismantle some of the predominant variations of identarianism

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‘A modernism that stood for the United States’

‘A modernism that stood for the United States’

Circus Girl Resting, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, 1924 From Los Angeles Review of Books: Here is a list of some major players in Cold War Modernists, Greg Barnhisel’s fascinating and meticulously researched history of modernist art and literature’s role in Cold War diplomacy: the American Artists Professional League (AAPL); the American Federation...

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Three quarters reach for their phones…

Three quarters reach for their phones…

“As smoking gives us something to do with our hands when we aren’t using them, Time gives us something to do with our minds when we aren’t thinking,” Dwight Macdonald wrote in 1957.

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Two Lines of Poetic Development

Two Lines of Poetic Development

What seems to me chiefly remarkable in the popular conception of a Poet is its unlikeness to the truth. Misconception in this case has been flattered, I fear, by the poets themselves.

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One company now owns 214 of Canada’s newspapers…

One company now owns 214 of Canada’s newspapers…

For most of the last century, newspapers were a licence to print money. Sports car-driving sales people boasted of turning down clients because the paper was too full; they couldn’t take another ad.

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Sorokin has long been tarred as a scandalmonger and, even worse, a postmodernist…

Sorokin has long been tarred as a scandalmonger and, even worse, a postmodernist…

I’ve been waiting for years for Vladimir Sorokin’s second novel, Norma (The Norm), to appear in English translation. It wasn’t published in the author’s native Russia until 1994, a decade after Sorokin finished it, so perhaps there’s hope yet.

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Tweets of Flair

Tweets of Flair

But the idea that I might order for the benefit of social-media sharing haunted the evening. Every time the staff checked in on us, I felt my gut tighten, expecting to be asked if we’d yet tweeted the sea scallops, a red item on our table.

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Is it time to turn a critical eye on the spectrum?

Is it time to turn a critical eye on the spectrum?

The words that the non-disabled use to talk about the disabled, or just the non-neurotypical, have not typically been known for nuance or tact.

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Setsuko Adachi: Shinjinrui

Setsuko Adachi: Shinjinrui

At the City Hall, the two women, mother and daughter, were there to renew the latter’s passport. They got there at fifteen minutes to nine.

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The Women of Greenham Common

The Women of Greenham Common

I never went to Greenham Common peace camp. I was a child during the main years - between 1981 and 1987. I don’t remember seeing any news coverage of the camp, especially compared to my vivid memories of reports on the miners’ strike.

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The Giraffe and the Zookeeper and Diski

The Giraffe and the Zookeeper and Diski

In 2014, there was a bit of a stir here in the UK and in Europe when the Copenhagen Zoo announced that it was going to kill an 18 month-old giraffe called Marius.

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The Goethezeit

The Goethezeit

If he hadn’t lived from 1749 to 1832, safely into the modern era and the age of print, but had instead flourished when Shakespeare did, there would certainly be scholars today theorizing that the life and work of half a dozen men had been combined under Goethe’s name.

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The left and right alike have misunderstood deconstruction…

The left and right alike have misunderstood deconstruction…

Over the past four decades, scholars in the American humanities have used deconstruction — a style of interpretation pioneered by the French philosopher Jacques Derrida.

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