Berfrois

Baudelaire’s Flowers

Baudelaire’s Flowers

Paris wasn’t then what it is now...

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“Play that thing, Jazz band!”

“Play that thing, Jazz band!”

To experience a version of the cool exhilaration of a mid-twentieth-century American jazz night, one might start by listening to an iconic Miles Davis recording...

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Now to be Humorous

Now to be Humorous

I don’t catch Phillis Wheatley’s joke at first...

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Hoof, Wing, Paw

Hoof, Wing, Paw

I’ve always loved Jim Harrison’s poetry—so full of itself, so direct and hungry and angered and awed...

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George Reiner on Mira Mattar

George Reiner on Mira Mattar

Affiliation is a geography of bleeding boundaries and abrupt junctures...

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Elizabeth Bishop’s Proliferal Style by Angus Cleghorn

Elizabeth Bishop’s Proliferal Style by Angus Cleghorn

Bishop’s persona is part she-moose, part bus; part warrior-fish, part oily vessel; part pastoral idyll, and part atomic bomb...

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Douglas Penick: archie period

Douglas Penick: archie period

thank you for apple peelings in the wastepaper basket...

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Timelessnesses

Timelessnesses

Inside St Mary’s Church in Gdańsk stands a Clock of Everything. At fourteen metres, it was the tallest clock ever built when Hans Düringer completed it in 1470...

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Joe Linker on Keith Kopka

Joe Linker on Keith Kopka

It's poetry where the Punk finds their way out of the mosh pit and into the solo business of writing poems to make sense of it all...

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It’s All Argentinian to Arturo Desimone

It’s All Argentinian to Arturo Desimone

Have they clocked our nocturnal ways that bite at kleptomaniac clockhands in our capitals?

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How Calm!

How Calm!

The first person to be photographed was a man having his boots cleaned. There were others in the same street, but they moved and became invisible...

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The Lyric’s Return in Black British Poetics

The Lyric’s Return in Black British Poetics

This essay considers some reasons for lyric’s return in black British poetics by first taking a broad look at the field, and then by attending to the work of several poets writing since the 1990s but publishing most visibly since the millennium...

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Pine

Pine

Well I grew up in the New Zealand of country pubs and sheep and macrocarpas; and beyond it, we were told, was a planet structured around the British Empire turning into the Commonwealth turning into... something else...

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Marian Janssen on Carolyn Kizer

Marian Janssen on Carolyn Kizer

Carolyn Kizer, feminist poet and founding editor of Poetry Northwest, became the first Program Director for Literature at the National Endowment for the Arts in 1966...

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A Fitting Timepiece by Daniel Tobin

A Fitting Timepiece by Daniel Tobin

Dynamics and architecture: the very attributes required for making an Internet, a universe, an emergent God, a creation, certainly a poem...

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Marian Janssen on John Berryman

Marian Janssen on John Berryman

Letters are always self-involved, but Berryman’s are often insufferably self-obsessed, even if they are meant to be letters of condolence...

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Marian Janssen on Elizabeth Bishop

Marian Janssen on Elizabeth Bishop

Thomas Travisano paints a structured, sensitive portrait of Bishop. He is at his best when explaining her work, which he immaculately interweaves with her life.

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Jessica Sequeira: Two Augurs

Jessica Sequeira: Two Augurs

Archaic, oracular and paradoxical ,  inspired by studies of occult philosophy yet destined for a wider readership unacquainted with these currents , this collection of poems by Olga Acevedo

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Poet Times

Poet Times

The poet is born in squalor, his first love. Some of the poet’s favorite words include seedy, shabby, seamy.

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Amit Majmudar on Anthony Madrid

Amit Majmudar on Anthony Madrid

Not all limericks are not-quite-nonsense, but the most limerickish ones are. As Anthony Madrid, author of a new collection of limericks illustrated by Mark Fletcher, says in a short essay...

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Cry On My Stomach

Cry On My Stomach

The title of Elaine Kahn’s new collection, Romance or The End (Soft Skull Press, 2020), feels like an ultimatum. Traditionally—heteronormatively—the end comes just after the wedding

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