Berfrois

Dear Moment

Dear Moment

I came to philosophy bursting with things to say. Somewhere along the way, that changed...

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Stand Up, Stretch, Set Off

Stand Up, Stretch, Set Off

If Friedrich Nietzsche were alive today, what would he think of our times? “The nations are again drawing away from one another and long to tear one another to pieces”...

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Jeremy Fernando translates Anne Dufourmantelle

Jeremy Fernando translates Anne Dufourmantelle

At the risk of leaving in a car for dinner in the city and ending up in Rome, the next day, after having rolled all night, because of a change of mind.

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Distinctive Diderot

Distinctive Diderot

The most radical thinker of the eighteenth century, Denis Diderot (1713–1784), is not exactly a forgotten man, though he has been long overshadowed by his contemporaries Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

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Tidying up is not joyful but another misuse of Eastern ideas

Tidying up is not joyful but another misuse of Eastern ideas

It is the nature of Marie Kondo's attraction to Westerners that gives me pause. This registers most powerfully for me when...

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M. Munro: The Unconscious

M. Munro: The Unconscious

“Thinking,” Paul de Man is reported to have said, “is finding a good quotation.”

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A Disanalogy of Disanalogies by Roland Bolz

A Disanalogy of Disanalogies by Roland Bolz

The following is ascribed to the 20th Century Polish mathematician Stefan Banach. "A mathematician is a person who can find analogies between theorems...

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Jeremy Fernando on Tembusu College

Jeremy Fernando on Tembusu College

In many ways, gender — much like religion — is at best imaginary, at worse, nonsense.

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M. Munro on Philosophy and Silence

M. Munro on Philosophy and Silence

Philosophy undoubtedly has something to do with the experience of silence – that much is clear. What’s not at all clear, however...

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Into the Adorno-Verse

Into the Adorno-Verse

Is there any way to intervene usefully or meaningfully in public debate, in what the extremely online Twitter users are with gleeful irony calling the ‘discourse’ of the present moment?

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What Are Popular Economies?

What Are Popular Economies?

What forms does living labour take, today, outside of the factory? In an Argentinian context, this question has grown in importance ever since the eruption of movements of unemployed workers at the beginning of this century.

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The Philosopher of Perhaps. Or?—

The Philosopher of Perhaps. Or?—

All his life, Friedrich Nietzsche hated being photographed. Execution “by the one-eyed Cyclops,” he called it.

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How much différance does it make?

How much différance does it make?

In the five years since I moved to Paris as an American philosopher, my disdain for what Americans know as ‘French theory’ has only deepened...

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Ed Simon: A Gospel for the Left

Ed Simon: A Gospel for the Left

Pause and reflect on the implications of a white Protestant in the Jim Crow South applying America’s ugliest word to Christ...

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Soap and Bones

Soap and Bones

When viewed on a hot plate under a polarising microscope, liquid crystals appear as a fluctuating kaleidoscope of colour: swirling, as Esther Leslie describes them, like ‘twisting lines of silks’...

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A Historical Parable by Ed Simon

A Historical Parable by Ed Simon

Pennsylvania’s frontier in the decade after both the Seven Years War and Pontiac’s fearsome Indian rebellion was a paranoid place...

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Justin E. H. Smith: Notes on Hands

Justin E. H. Smith: Notes on Hands

I am haunted by an image I first saw many years ago of a ‘cortical homunculus’: a figure of a sort of man, whose bodily parts are variously shrunken...

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Foucault, the Drowned and the Saved

Foucault, the Drowned and the Saved

Foucault would have wanted 'very important people of the world' to refer to the refugees, not himself...

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‘Critical thinking is not bracketed off from poetic and political imaginaries’

‘Critical thinking is not bracketed off from poetic and political imaginaries’

In conversations with students feeling overwhelmed by their studies, I sometimes use the phrase, ‘remember that studying is part of life, not the other way around.’

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