Berfrois

Ed Simon: D-Day 75 Years Later

Ed Simon: D-Day 75 Years Later

Seventy-five years ago, and more than 150,000 men would land on the Normandy coast, arriving on very French beaches assigned the very American names of Utah and Omaha

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Teeny-Tiny Frilly Fragments

Teeny-Tiny Frilly Fragments

In a world where the whole is beyond coherent representation (as Benjamin believed it to be) we are left with fragments...

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Sans Edits

Sans Edits

Trying to get a point across in public writing, whether established or clickbait media, with just the nuance, force, and connotations you intend, is like trying to perform a violin solo underwater...

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M. Munro: Not the Flag Flying

M. Munro: Not the Flag Flying

Sketch, Léon Cogniet, 1870 by M. Munro No agreement exists as to the possibility of defining negation, as to its logical status, function, and meaning, as to its field of applicability. “The mystery of negation: This is not how things are, and yet we can say how things are...

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Ed Simon: The First Question

Ed Simon: The First Question

From whence did the interrogative arise? In what pool of primordial muck could the first question have been asked?

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Kant ‘N Marx

Kant ‘N Marx

In 1784 Immanuel Kant described humanity as being in a state of immaturity, which to Kant is “the inability to use one’s own understanding without the guidance of another”

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Enlightened, Much?

Enlightened, Much?

How enlightened was the Enlightenment? Not a few critics have seen it as profoundly benighted. For some, it was a seedbed for modern racism and imperialism; the light in the Enlightenment, one recent scholar has suggested, essentially meant “white.”

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Stand Up, Stretch, Set Off

Stand Up, Stretch, Set Off

If Friedrich Nietzsche were alive today, what would he think of our times? “The nations are again drawing away from one another and long to tear one another to pieces”...

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Dear Moment

Dear Moment

I came to philosophy bursting with things to say. Somewhere along the way, that changed...

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Jeremy Fernando translates Anne Dufourmantelle

Jeremy Fernando translates Anne Dufourmantelle

At the risk of leaving in a car for dinner in the city and ending up in Rome, the next day, after having rolled all night, because of a change of mind.

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Distinctive Diderot

Distinctive Diderot

The most radical thinker of the eighteenth century, Denis Diderot (1713–1784), is not exactly a forgotten man, though he has been long overshadowed by his contemporaries Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

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Tidying up is not joyful but another misuse of Eastern ideas

Tidying up is not joyful but another misuse of Eastern ideas

It is the nature of Marie Kondo's attraction to Westerners that gives me pause. This registers most powerfully for me when...

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M. Munro: The Unconscious

M. Munro: The Unconscious

“Thinking,” Paul de Man is reported to have said, “is finding a good quotation.”

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A Disanalogy of Disanalogies by Roland Bolz

A Disanalogy of Disanalogies by Roland Bolz

The following is ascribed to the 20th Century Polish mathematician Stefan Banach. "A mathematician is a person who can find analogies between theorems...

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Jeremy Fernando on Tembusu College

Jeremy Fernando on Tembusu College

In many ways, gender — much like religion — is at best imaginary, at worse, nonsense.

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M. Munro on Philosophy and Silence

M. Munro on Philosophy and Silence

Philosophy undoubtedly has something to do with the experience of silence – that much is clear. What’s not at all clear, however...

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Into the Adorno-Verse

Into the Adorno-Verse

Is there any way to intervene usefully or meaningfully in public debate, in what the extremely online Twitter users are with gleeful irony calling the ‘discourse’ of the present moment?

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What Are Popular Economies?

What Are Popular Economies?

What forms does living labour take, today, outside of the factory? In an Argentinian context, this question has grown in importance ever since the eruption of movements of unemployed workers at the beginning of this century.

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The Philosopher of Perhaps. Or?—

The Philosopher of Perhaps. Or?—

All his life, Friedrich Nietzsche hated being photographed. Execution “by the one-eyed Cyclops,” he called it.

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How much différance does it make?

How much différance does it make?

In the five years since I moved to Paris as an American philosopher, my disdain for what Americans know as ‘French theory’ has only deepened...

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