Berfrois

Summer Ice

Summer Ice

Since 1980, computer models have been predicting that a rise in atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide will cause the Arctic to warm twice as fast as areas at lower latitudes...

Read More

Contesting Coyote Contests

Contesting Coyote Contests

Coyote killing competitions, where contestants vie to shoot the most animals, are held throughout the U.S. But some hunting groups are denouncing these events as unethical, and states from New Mexico to New York are considering bans on these and other wildlife killing contests...

Read More

Icy Fossil Poetry

Icy Fossil Poetry

Language bends and buckles under pressure of climate change. Take the adjective ‘glacial’. I recently came across an old draft of my PhD dissertation on which my advisor had scrawled the rebuke: ‘You’re proceeding at a glacial pace. You’re skating on thin ice.’

Read More

Once you flip to the urchin barren state…

Once you flip to the urchin barren state…

In eastern Tasmania, sea surface temperatures have increased at four times the average global rate, according to Johnson, who along with colleague Scott Ling has closely studied the region’s kelp forest losses.

Read More

Wanted: Camaraderie and Purpose

Wanted: Camaraderie and Purpose

We are, one hears, spending too much time on Appalachia. There are too many dispatches from woebegone towns...

Read More

Hoary-Headed Frosts

Hoary-Headed Frosts

As climatologists define it, the Little Ice Age was a long-term cooling of the Northern Hemisphere between 1300 and 1850...

Read More

Before and After Fossil Fuels

Before and After Fossil Fuels

Every round-trip ticket on flights from New York to London, keep in mind, costs the Arctic three more square meters of ice.

Read More

Lital Khaikin: To Justify Land

Lital Khaikin: To Justify Land

On the ancient river, seagull rock crests out of the waters. An outcrop within its sight is thorned by a few young silhouettes, taking turns plunging into the river some feet below. Riverboats and water taxis, white river cruise-ships weave short and cyclical tours between the two shores.

Read More

“We were born here. It is our land and our river…”

“We were born here. It is our land and our river…”

Much of COPINH’s power lies in combining political radicalism — anti-military, anti-patriarchal, anti-capitalist, and anti-American — with a deep conservative attachment to the Lenca peoples’ heritage and land.

Read More

He was a Road

He was a Road

Since November 9th, many Americans have been searching for ways to incorporate political activism into their everyday lives, to get out of the echo chambers that keep them among only like-minded people.

Read More

Only Somewhat

Only Somewhat

Over the course of 2016, the global security landscape darkened as the international community failed to come effectively to grips with humanity’s most pressing existential threats, nuclear weapons and climate change.

Read More

What signifies the beauty of nature when men are base?

What signifies the beauty of nature when men are base?

Nature and landscape are palimpsests of history and social violence more than they are alternatives to them. They show back to the observer the durability and definiteness of the world people have made so far.

Read More

‘What about the starlings?’

‘What about the starlings?’

A flock of starlings in flight is called a “murmuration,” one of the most pleasing collective nouns. It’s also one of nature’s most pleasing sights, an undulating mass of thousands of black dots that coalesce into hypnotic shapes, like an airborne Rorschach test or a lava lamp.

Read More

When, Drunk, One

When, Drunk, One

Living in rural Vermont, I enjoy proximity to wilderness, though I observe its sickness at close range. In spring, my family marks the return of swallows and red-winged blackbirds on the barn door.

Read More

‘This won’t kill the Paris process, but it will severely weaken it’

‘This won’t kill the Paris process, but it will severely weaken it’

With so little to guide predictions, the reality of a Trump presidency has become a national Rorschach test. Conservatives and the anti-establishment imagine an ascendant Trump will set a path for a more competitive national economy, smaller government, and a stronger defense.

Read More

Coal’s Victory

Coal’s Victory

Peabody Energy is, by its own description, the “largest private sector coal company in the world.” It’s also bankrupt. The company, based in St. Louis, filed for Chapter 11 this past April. Today, on the news of Donald Trump’s victory, Peabody’s stock surged almost fifty per cent.

Read More

A Drop Fell on the Umbrella Magnolias

A Drop Fell on the Umbrella Magnolias

On rare occasions, the townsfolk of Amherst, Massachusetts, would catch a glimpse of a ghostly figure dressed in white, leaning over to tend her flowers by flickering lantern light.

Read More

Fang Marks

Fang Marks

We meet a fat diamondback five minutes down the trail. He is stretched across the path, dozing in the shade of a juniper bush.

Read More