Berfrois

Ed Simon: First Five Observations about the Moment

Ed Simon: First Five Observations about the Moment

Life experienced narratively, which is to say the only way actual life can be experienced, continually deletes the immediacy of the transitory, but in depicting the specifically of the second within the crystalline moment artists reendow the present with meaning.

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‘I look underneath my desk and think I might sit there’

‘I look underneath my desk and think I might sit there’

I can’t pick up the clothes. I can’t explain the granite of that “can’t” to anyone else, the way it feels impossible to beat. Look at me looking at the pile and you will think, Just pick it up. For fuck’s sake.

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D.H. Lawrence on Moby Dick

D.H. Lawrence on Moby Dick

For Moby Dick, the huge white sperm whale: who is old, hoary, monstrous, and swims alone; who is unspeakably terrible in his wrath, having so often been attacked; and snow-white...

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Devin King on Lindsay Turner

Devin King on Lindsay Turner

If you open Lindsay Turner’s new book of poems, Songs and Ballads, at random, you’re going to be looking at a poem that’s meant to be sung, and it’s more than likely on a topic you would never think to sing about...

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Clarice Lispector’s Persona

Clarice Lispector’s Persona

At a reading I gave in Seattle two years ago, a man with white hair told me he had once lived in Brazil and had named his daughter after Clarice Lispector..

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Harold Abramowitz & Janice Lee: Motion and Resistance

Harold Abramowitz & Janice Lee: Motion and Resistance

Last night I crossed a river in my dream and so today I translate the journey into thinking for tomorrow.

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Jessica Sequeira: Julio Barrenechea in India

Jessica Sequeira: Julio Barrenechea in India

Sun of India, Barrenechea’s book of poems, was published in New Delhi while he was living there. At first read, it may seem a simple take on the traditions of the country as filtered through the sensibility of the poet...

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“Sell poetry as a hit, the way you sell coffee or chilli”

“Sell poetry as a hit, the way you sell coffee or chilli”

Even after escaping school, Moran’s late teens were miserable. “I was trying to figure out what the hell to do. I didn’t have any qualifications and I was pretty desperate.

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Joel Gn on Laurie Stone

Joel Gn on Laurie Stone

Most of Stone’s writings touch on the transformations from loves lost and found. In particular, the narrator’s relationship with her mother, whom she affectionately refers to as ‘Toby’ is at times strained...

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Ed Simon on the Number Three

Ed Simon on the Number Three

Behold, the first odd prime, designator of our three dimensions, that which was the number of times Peter denied Christ, the number of times Satan tempted him, and the number of days he spent in the grave...

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It’s Coming Home, Though

It’s Coming Home, Though

The danger is that we allow English nationalism to be defined by the forces of darkness and xenophobia, as witnessed during the Brexit referendum.

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A Politics of Mere Being by Carl Phillips

A Politics of Mere Being by Carl Phillips

When my first book of poems came out in 1992, I learned what it could mean to be seen as a political poet for no other reason than because of who or what one is...

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Now it’s light, now it’s a shadow…

Now it’s light, now it’s a shadow…

A Russian poet died in North Carolina, on Friday. His name was Naum Korzhavin.

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Virginia Woolf On Not Knowing Greek

Virginia Woolf On Not Knowing Greek

For it is vain and foolish to talk of knowing Greek, since in our ignorance we should be at the bottom of any class of schoolboys, since we do not know how the words sounded...

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The Shattering Din of the Morning Star by Lital Khaikin

The Shattering Din of the Morning Star by Lital Khaikin

Memory is struck into the air. Time is recalling itself, spring is recovering the body. “What is the name of the great double nest?” Mnemosyne, daughter of Earth and Heaven, writes the unearthing...

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Scott Manley Hadley on Jon Fosse

Scott Manley Hadley on Jon Fosse

Of all the nations of Europe with a rich literary tradition, Norway is a country that seems–whether by accident or design–to export exclusively exquisite fiction...

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Don’t Cry

Don’t Cry

It’s early on a Sunday morning in January of 2010. I sit on the edge of the bed, already dressed, with my hand on my partner’s foot as he sleeps. The night before, I couldn’t catch my breath, and I told myself that if I felt the same in...

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A Year in Windom

A Year in Windom

In the 1963–’64 Windom High School yearbook, there is an entire page dedicated to my Palestinian father. During his one year as an exchange student in Windom, Minnesota, he played on the tennis team...

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