Berfrois

Ed Simon: Resurrecting American Civil Religion

Ed Simon: Resurrecting American Civil Religion

What ten sentences have been more scriptural than the ones delivered by Abraham Lincoln in that southern Pennsylvanian killing field? Not just scriptural in rhetoric...

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Justin E. H. Smith: Notes on Social Media and Autocracy

Justin E. H. Smith: Notes on Social Media and Autocracy

We have learned that part of Russia's intervention in the 2016 US election included placing ads on Facebook that spanned the political spectrum...

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Residents of Reality

Residents of Reality

‘Postmodernity’ has a history. It came not from nowhere, but rather from ‘modernity,’ which in Europe historians have traditionally dated from the eighteenth-century French Enlightenment.

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Ed Simon: Second Twelve Observations about Goodness

Ed Simon: Second Twelve Observations about Goodness

by Ed Simon XIII. Blessed is he among all the saints, for spurned though he is, Judas Iscariot was the one who first set the world toward its redemption, with a kiss. For that loyalty to God, Christ was resurrected, but lamentable Judas must forever sit in the frozen...

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Justin E. H. Smith: Notes on Yer

Justin E. H. Smith: Notes on Yer

In Old Church Slavonic there were two letters representing short vowels. These were called ‘yer’, and there were two species of them: the ‘front yer’, ‘ь’, and the ‘back yer’, ‘ъ’.

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Ed Simon: First Twelve Observations about Goodness

Ed Simon: First Twelve Observations about Goodness

One fourteenth century morning in the village of Montalilou, a simple woman named Bartholomette d’Urs, who slept every evening in her bed next to her young son, awoke to find that her boy had died of some unknown cause in the night.

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Jeremy Fernando: Nine Steps on the Ladder of Writhing

Jeremy Fernando: Nine Steps on the Ladder of Writhing

this is perhaps the tragedy of the photographic object, the object that is photographed: that in order to preserve its writing — the writing of light — the object has to be consigned into the shadows of time.

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Read Barthes

Read Barthes

The ad was meticulously crafted to foster outrage. I reposted it, commenting that it was “the most disgusting ad I’ve ever seen,” disregarding the inevitable: that my conservative friends might repost it.

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Somewhere Between Solitude and Loneliness

Somewhere Between Solitude and Loneliness

In 1840, Edgar Allan Poe described the ‘mad energy’ of an ageing man who roved the streets of London from dusk till dawn.

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That Time the Way That It Is and Was

That Time the Way That It Is and Was

So far this makes it sound as if philosophers are a bunch of science fiction spoil sports. Not so! Although philosophers typically agree that we cannot change the past, most think it possible to causally affect the past.

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Justin E. H. Smith: The Stockholm Conspiracy

Justin E. H. Smith: The Stockholm Conspiracy

While Monsieur Descartes was living peacefully at the Court of Sweden, whither his virtue, his dedication to the truth, his great genius in the sciences

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Jeremy Fernando: Echoes Of and From Jean Baudrillard

Jeremy Fernando: Echoes Of and From Jean Baudrillard

After all, he be the one who called for a disappearance even before he disappeared.

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Jeremy Woolsey on Buddhism and the Dead

Jeremy Woolsey on Buddhism and the Dead

When my grandpa died, we took his ashes to an IN-N-Out in Southern California and scattered them at the base of a palm tree when no one seemed to be watching.

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Justin E. H. Smith: The Search for Intelligent Life

Justin E. H. Smith: The Search for Intelligent Life

It is hard to read about SETI and more recent related projects looking for intelligent life in the stars without discerning in them certain silent presuppositions about what counts or should count as intelligent life on earth.

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Justin E. H. Smith On Plants

Justin E. H. Smith On Plants

Imagine you are in an urban park. Look around. How many animals do you see? I’d imagine you see a few birds, a dog or two, perhaps some insects, and a dozen or so humans.

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Gerardo Muñoz on Andrés Ajens

Gerardo Muñoz on Andrés Ajens

To write or speak on behalf of Ajens’ recent book, Cúmulo Lúcumo (Das Kapital, 2017), is already to allude to its secret vortex. Cúmulo is a book that we welcome and celebrate yet another feat of language that dwells in a threshold.

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The Hermeneutics of Babies

The Hermeneutics of Babies

Babies are usually the stuff of private life, clichés, and endearing memories that we check out as we set foot on campus grounds. Yet babies are the greatest--and arguably the cutest--hermeneutic subjects.

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j/j hastain: Priest/ess

j/j hastain: Priest/ess

My thought-forms don’t appear to me as grammar. For so long in my life I felt taxed by this—a kind of soul stressor. Would I have to translate these thought-forms pure from mystery into normative grammar for my entire life?

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‘Before Foucault, political philosophers had presumed that power had an essence’

‘Before Foucault, political philosophers had presumed that power had an essence’

Foucault remains one of the most cited 20th-century thinkers and is, according to some lists, the single most cited figure across the humanities and social sciences.

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Gerardo Muñoz on Roberto Esposito

Gerardo Muñoz on Roberto Esposito

In a sequence of thirteen sections, Esposito dwells on the question of the origin of the political in light of western decline into nihilism, empire, and modern totalitarianism.

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