Berfrois

Jeremy Fernando: Nine Steps on the Ladder of Writhing

Jeremy Fernando: Nine Steps on the Ladder of Writhing

this is perhaps the tragedy of the photographic object, the object that is photographed: that in order to preserve its writing — the writing of light — the object has to be consigned into the shadows of time.

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Read Barthes

Read Barthes

The ad was meticulously crafted to foster outrage. I reposted it, commenting that it was “the most disgusting ad I’ve ever seen,” disregarding the inevitable: that my conservative friends might repost it.

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Somewhere Between Solitude and Loneliness

Somewhere Between Solitude and Loneliness

In 1840, Edgar Allan Poe described the ‘mad energy’ of an ageing man who roved the streets of London from dusk till dawn.

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That Time the Way That It Is and Was

That Time the Way That It Is and Was

So far this makes it sound as if philosophers are a bunch of science fiction spoil sports. Not so! Although philosophers typically agree that we cannot change the past, most think it possible to causally affect the past.

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Justin E. H. Smith: The Stockholm Conspiracy

Justin E. H. Smith: The Stockholm Conspiracy

While Monsieur Descartes was living peacefully at the Court of Sweden, whither his virtue, his dedication to the truth, his great genius in the sciences

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Jeremy Fernando: Echoes Of and From Jean Baudrillard

Jeremy Fernando: Echoes Of and From Jean Baudrillard

After all, he be the one who called for a disappearance even before he disappeared.

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Jeremy Woolsey on Buddhism and the Dead

Jeremy Woolsey on Buddhism and the Dead

When my grandpa died, we took his ashes to an IN-N-Out in Southern California and scattered them at the base of a palm tree when no one seemed to be watching.

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Justin E. H. Smith: The Search for Intelligent Life

Justin E. H. Smith: The Search for Intelligent Life

It is hard to read about SETI and more recent related projects looking for intelligent life in the stars without discerning in them certain silent presuppositions about what counts or should count as intelligent life on earth.

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Justin E. H. Smith On Plants

Justin E. H. Smith On Plants

Imagine you are in an urban park. Look around. How many animals do you see? I’d imagine you see a few birds, a dog or two, perhaps some insects, and a dozen or so humans.

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Gerardo Muñoz on Andrés Ajens

Gerardo Muñoz on Andrés Ajens

To write or speak on behalf of Ajens’ recent book, Cúmulo Lúcumo (Das Kapital, 2017), is already to allude to its secret vortex. Cúmulo is a book that we welcome and celebrate yet another feat of language that dwells in a threshold.

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The Hermeneutics of Babies

The Hermeneutics of Babies

Babies are usually the stuff of private life, clichés, and endearing memories that we check out as we set foot on campus grounds. Yet babies are the greatest--and arguably the cutest--hermeneutic subjects.

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j/j hastain: Priest/ess

j/j hastain: Priest/ess

My thought-forms don’t appear to me as grammar. For so long in my life I felt taxed by this—a kind of soul stressor. Would I have to translate these thought-forms pure from mystery into normative grammar for my entire life?

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‘Before Foucault, political philosophers had presumed that power had an essence’

‘Before Foucault, political philosophers had presumed that power had an essence’

Foucault remains one of the most cited 20th-century thinkers and is, according to some lists, the single most cited figure across the humanities and social sciences.

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Gerardo Muñoz on Roberto Esposito

Gerardo Muñoz on Roberto Esposito

In a sequence of thirteen sections, Esposito dwells on the question of the origin of the political in light of western decline into nihilism, empire, and modern totalitarianism.

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Voltaire described Devadatta as a badly behaved rascal…

Voltaire described Devadatta as a badly behaved rascal…

by Donald S. Lopez, Jr. This article was originally published at Public Domain Review, under a Creative Commons 3.0 license. After Ignatius Loyola formed the Society of Jesus in 1539, he required that his missionaries send back detailed letters describing their activities and the peoples and places they encountered. In France,...

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We must be ready to mingle on the dance floor…

We must be ready to mingle on the dance floor…

The antiliberal left has never been cooler. By ‘cool’ here I mean that its members have honed a mocking and casual disdain of the center-left’s alarmism, with a massive proliferation of memes and jokes.

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Why do some rare individuals become the vehicles of universal ideas?

Why do some rare individuals become the vehicles of universal ideas?

Born on May 5, 1818, in Trier, a city in the German Rhineland, Marx was the third child of Jewish converts to Christianity. His father Heinrich, né Herschel, had no choice except to fall in with the Lutheran Church if he wished to practice law in Prussia.

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Stuart Elden on Ernst Kantorowicz

Stuart Elden on Ernst Kantorowicz

Kantorowicz led a remarkable life, and it seems only right to wonder what else he might have achieved as a scholar had he not encountered so many challenges to his academic career.

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Gerardo Muñoz on Jean-Luc Nancy

Gerardo Muñoz on Jean-Luc Nancy

Jean Luc Nancy’s The Banality of Heidegger (Fordham, 2017) is yet another contribution to the ongoing debate on Heidegger and Nazism, in the wake of the publication of the Black Notebooks in recent years.

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Michael O’Rourke: The Afterlives of Queer Theory

Michael O’Rourke: The Afterlives of Queer Theory

If queer thinking were reduced to being the province of one particular thinker then its multiple localities would be worryingly narrowed and its localities would become merely parochial.

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