Berfrois

What binds Hongkongers?

What binds Hongkongers?

What binds Hongkongers as a human collective to speak truth to power? Generations have experienced Hong Kong as a land of opportunities and refuge.

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A Very Guatemalan Conspiracy

A Very Guatemalan Conspiracy

From The New Yorker: After Rosenberg heard that the Musas had been shot, he rushed to the scene. Luis Mendizábal, a longtime friend and client of Rosenberg’s, told me, “I asked him to come and pick me up, so we could go to the place together. He said, ‘No,...

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Kamel Daoud’s Daily Dose of Subversion

Kamel Daoud’s Daily Dose of Subversion

Yves Jeanmougin Translation and introduction by Suzanne Ruta Le Quotidien d’Oran is one of Algeria’s most widely read French language dailies. People say they buy it just to read Kamel Daoud’s page three chronique or column, Raina raikoum, (my opinion, your opinion). In a country where the lone TV station...

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For over a year, Icelanders were alive…

For over a year, Icelanders were alive…

The Kitchenware-Revolution, Austurvöllur square, Reykjavik From Mediapart: Jorgen Jorgensen, a Danish adventurer who died in the wilds of Tasmania in 1841, is, as a result of his various misadventures, a laughing stock in his native land. However, one of this prolific writer’s exploits did have irrefutable panache. In 1809...

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“You keep going on about there being no plays about Protestants”

“You keep going on about there being no plays about Protestants”

Dr Urbanus From Le Monde Diplomatique: One evening in November 2005, as Gary Mitchell sat on his sofa at home in a Belfast suburb, watching Rangers play Porto on the telly, he heard his wife shout from the kitchen: “They’re on top of the car!” Then, she shouted, “They’re...

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Interpreting Lulismo

Interpreting Lulismo

Lula's Brazil | Perry Anderson

London Review of Books

Contrary to a well-known English dictum, stoical if self-exonerating, all political lives do not end in failure. In postwar Europe, it is enough to think of Adenauer or De Gasperi, or perhaps...

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Dharamsala’s Democratic Dalai Lama

Dharamsala’s Democratic Dalai Lama

McLeod Ganj, Dharamshala From The New York Review of Books: It’s been startling to witness mass demonstrations in countries across the Middle East for freedom from autocracy, while, in the Tibetan community, a die-hard champion of “people power” tries to dethrone himself and his people keep asking him to...

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Sex Please, We’re Russian

Sex Please, We’re Russian

Final of Miss Russia 2010. In Soviet times, beauty contests were unknown. Ideologists considered such public displays of the female body as decadent bourgeois behavior. by Elena Fanailova A couple of years ago I was part of a group of young female writers on an Oxford University course called...

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Heather Sharkey on Southern Sudan

Heather Sharkey on Southern Sudan

  by Heather J. Sharkey Civil wars ravaged Sudan in the mid-to-late twentieth century.  Most fighting occurred between government armies and southern “rebel” forces during two stretches of conflict, often called the “first civil war”, waged between 1955 and 1971, and the “second civil war”, waged after 1983.   Southern...

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Freedom, Brooms and Rollers

Freedom, Brooms and Rollers

From The New York Review of Books: For hours, I wandered the downtown streets with friends, watched young men and women dance on boats moored on the banks of the Nile, chatting with strangers, taking pictures of soldiers and officers who were speaking to crowds around them about how...

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Cannibalism became commonplace…

Cannibalism became commonplace…

From Words Without Borders: “The Story of Serafima Andreyevna”, by Igort (translated by Jamie Richards), Words Without Borders

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