Berfrois

Nicholas Rombes on Dana Levin

Nicholas Rombes on Dana Levin

Patti had been the one to introduce me to the poets who changed my life, the course of my life. One of them was Dana Levin.

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“Why wouldn’t you call it a novel?”

“Why wouldn’t you call it a novel?”

Well, it’s actually kind of an accident that I established my career as a nonfiction writer. From childhood I wanted to be a novelist.

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Nothing can eclipse the first Lord Rothermere’s long infatuation with Hitler…

Nothing can eclipse the first Lord Rothermere’s long infatuation with Hitler…

The daily routine of any newspaper is structured around meetings, known as conferences, but, to quote a regular attender of them, the Mail’s meetings resemble “this weird fucking feudal court”

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Eric D. Lehman: Fear of the Dog

Eric D. Lehman: Fear of the Dog

It is the civilized human’s sustained tendency toward irrational belief that Conan Doyle sets up as the central issue of Hound of the Baskervilles.

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Black Comix

Black Comix

by Matthew Teutsch This month I interviewed Deborah E. Whaley about her book Black Women in Sequence: Re-Inking Comics, Graphic Novels, and Anime (University of Washington Press, 2015). Whaley is an artist, curator, writer, and Associate Professor of American Studies and African American Studies at the University of Iowa. She...

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Most Loving Force

Most Loving Force

In 1934, when he was 17, Lowell determined to be a poet; by the end of that year he had written 30 poems. Such productivity can be a symptom of mania, as Jamison notes elsewhere, though of course it can also just be a sign of ambition.

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Virginia Woolf: Thoughts on Peace in an Air Raid

Virginia Woolf: Thoughts on Peace in an Air Raid

The Germans were over this house last night and the night before that. Here they are again. It is a queer experience, lying in the dark and listening to the zoom of a hornet which may at any moment sting you to death.

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What if the Oulipian constraint is the body?

What if the Oulipian constraint is the body?

Is this mental/intellectual/psychological focus within Conceptualism ableist? At the very least it seems to be one-dimensional: the body marks a caesura, and it is a product of Conceptualism’s relationship with the body and its positioning of itself in relation to it.

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‘We all hate the poetry we learnt in school. Why?’

‘We all hate the poetry we learnt in school. Why?’

That the object of education should be to fit the child for life is such a trite and well-worn saying that people smile at its commonplaceness even while they agree with its obvious common sense.

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Grief Gave Agency

Grief Gave Agency

Translation is the loss of one form of communication but the gaining of another. A non-dualistic understanding of the world can in turn lead to a non-dualistic form(s) of communication within language.

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Ed Simon: The Brooklyn Project

Ed Simon: The Brooklyn Project

“What, what exactly have we done here?” asked Lynn Jackson, her heavy dreadlocks falling like curtains over her tasteful kente cloth blouse, which did not hide but rather emphasized her heavy, yet stately, if not regal, countenance.

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‘Slurring as if toothless and drunk’

‘Slurring as if toothless and drunk’

The van was a way to navigate through my grief. I imagined I was driving away from pain but in fact it filled the four corners of my vehicle. I drove the long way to LA, through the South and along the Mexican border.

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Eric D. Lehman: The Darkest Book of All

Eric D. Lehman: The Darkest Book of All

During dark times, we are drawn to dark books. Threats of chaos and futility skyrocket sales of nihilistic fictions like Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness.

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Nicholas Gamso on Patti Smith

Nicholas Gamso on Patti Smith

As Smith sang the words, she appeared a disused vessel, ruined by the trauma of modernity. Her eyes were in a squint, her collar, a prairie preacher’s, was plain.

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