Berfrois

Lyra and Pantalaimon

Lyra and Pantalaimon

I first read Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy as a young teen; it felt like a revelation. The books had a rough-textured animal-breath closeness that I had rarely encountered before...

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Rosalie Morales Kearns: Still a Life

Rosalie Morales Kearns: Still a Life

In the 1980s, having a poster of a Georgia O’Keeffe painting in my college dorm room made me feel sophisticated and grown-up: I’m living in New York, it announced....

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David Beer: A Love of Fakes

David Beer: A Love of Fakes

Byung-Chul Han’s writing breezes across the pages of Shanzhai. Laconic in style and concise in argument, this short book briefly outlines and illustrates some deceptively intricate arguments...

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Jeremy Fernando on Pan Huiting

Jeremy Fernando on Pan Huiting

Quite possibly one of the more enigmatic lines from a text that is always already an enigma.

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Eric D. Lehman: Art Below Sea Level

Eric D. Lehman: Art Below Sea Level

Whoever decided to keep the most art per square mile anywhere in the world below sea level had a singular faith in human civilization...

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Jackson Arn on Delacroix’s Photograph

Jackson Arn on Delacroix’s Photograph

There was a point somewhere between birth and puberty when I would spend hours drawing pictures of bearded men. What interested me most was the beards themselves...

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The Black Monday Protests in Polish Women’s Art

The Black Monday Protests in Polish Women’s Art

A dozen women sitting on the streets in Warsaw were surrounded by middle-aged male protestors wearing ‘football hooligan’ red-and-white scarves. There were insults, kicking...

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Francesco Tenaglia on Alessandro Agudio

Francesco Tenaglia on Alessandro Agudio

The path of Alessandro Agudio’s artistic practice intersects with some of this story: an important moment of institutional recognition for his work was his inclusion in Ennesima...

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David Beer on Georg Simmel

David Beer on Georg Simmel

In May 1913, German sociologist Georg Simmel wrote to the poet and essayist Margarete von Bendemann to express his joy at seeing some ‘magnificent Rembrandts’.

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Munching

Munching

George Bernard Shaw on Henrik Ibsen, Vladimir Nabokov on Nikolai Gogol, Henry Miller on Arthur Rimbaud, Nicholson Baker on John Updike: we are familiar with the genre in which authors write appreciatively about an admired predecessor...

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Paul Johnathan: Contorted Bodies

Paul Johnathan: Contorted Bodies

Alessio Bolzoni’s sophomore effort finds him intimate with the human form. The photographer’s new book, Abuse II, The Uncanny, features tense shots...

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Gorgeous Gorey!

Gorgeous Gorey!

How does a deeply read, supremely pyrotechnic wordsmith, pioneer of cyberculture who popularized culture jamming and first articulated the notion of Afrofuturism...

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How the Pre-Raphaelites Became Obsessed with the Wombat

How the Pre-Raphaelites Became Obsessed with the Wombat

Wombats captured the attention of English naturalists as soon as they found out about them from early settlers, explorers, and naturalists at the time of first contact...

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Colin Raff: Torpid Slivers #25-29

Colin Raff: Torpid Slivers #25-29

Even the best of us, in our tender years, were at some moments cruel to other children. But did you also instruct those you bullied to transform...

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Dreamlessness by Joseph Spece

Dreamlessness by Joseph Spece

In Bacon’s Studies of the Human Body (1970), a panel pays skewed homage to Caravaggio’s Narcissus or a Narcissus by the Caravaggisti.

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Sober Seers

Sober Seers

A prevailing notion of the lives of artists holds that hedonism is a meaningful part of production. The slide projector on the subject has no shortage of famous faces: There’s boozy Faulkner, banging out novels and screenplays while pickled...

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Elephants, Horses, and the Proportions of Paradise

Elephants, Horses, and the Proportions of Paradise

What does a perfect elephant look like? This was a question that occupied the Flemish artist Crispijn van de Passe II in the years around 1620. By then, several elephants had visited the European continent...

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‘Can we live ethically in a cursed world?’

‘Can we live ethically in a cursed world?’

I brought a friend with me the first time I saw Princess Mononoke in an American movie theater. He had no experience with Miyazaki or with Japanese culture or animation...

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Colin Raff: Torpid Slivers #20-24

Colin Raff: Torpid Slivers #20-24

There was a nice breeze going, and the footpost-knot was nodding more rapidly than usual, and maybe tonight it appeared more malevolent than it ever had before.

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Unsentimental Vistas

Unsentimental Vistas

When the American photographer Berenice Abbott returned to New York in 1929 after nearly a decade away in Paris, she came back to a city transformed...

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